Seeing the World, and Contributing to it, Through a Different Neurodiverse Spectrum, and the Richness that comes with it

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qvvrme5WIwA


This video (link above) from a real life story and perspective of an autistic lady of the RICHNESS  which NEURODIVERSITY can bring to the world, and the acceptance & embracing of the autism part of every autistic. 
We have a lot to bring to the world due to our unique experiences which are perhaps unique to the (Neuro)divergent.

Some of the great inventions which has moved our society/world forward by autistic brains.


To me, the pivotal milestone for this woman is captured starting from 07:50 part of the video. She talk about her discovery of Asperger's Syndrome

This reminded me of myself -
  • diagnosed late in life (so was she),
  • then able to look back at my life with a different view, from a different lens, with a clearer vision
  • to be able to make sense of my experiences (be it the good, the bad or the ugly, the rich and the poor, the usual and the unique, the ordinary and the out-of-the-ordinary) which previously did not make sense.
  • It marked a beginning of a new journey (which is still on-going, perhaps for a lifetime) of self-discovery, self-acceptance, understanding, finding my place in this world etc. like what this autistic woman in the video did. 
  • Finally there could be an end to "wondering why" and running in circles to be "normal". Through the journey I also discovered my passion for autism and the autism community.


A diagnosis of autism can be (or be a/an, or mean):

  • barrier beauty
  • condemned courageous
  • disaster discovery
  • eradicated embraced
  • fated future freedom of expression
  • hopeless hopeful
  • isolating interesting
  • mad magnificent
  • obstacle opportunity
  • pain purposeful
  • regression revival
  • sorrowful special
  • Zzzz (tiring) zealous



I hope all of us autistics can over time discover our niche / "sweet spot", be it in career, community, cause or something else, to discover and uncover the true "me" in each of us, and the beauty and diversity which overflows from it, enabling us to contribute to the community/society around us, to enhance the things/environment around us, and enrich the lives of the (Neuro)divergent. Sometimes, some life experiences which may not make sense to the typical may be necessary and beautiful for the divergent.

Our differences can open doors of communication from with-IN (the autism community) and with-OUT (beyond our community to the wider race of humanity).

All of these can only be possible when the autistics and neurodivergent learn to embrace ourselves and when the typical learn to treasure the diversity each one brings to the human race, no matter how different we are.

I leave all my readers with a few quotes from the video I found inspiring:

  1. (from 13:39 to 13:46) If we need a cure for anything, it is not for autism, it is for ignorance and intolerance.
  2. (from 16:30 to 16:56) It is unacceptable that because some don't fit a standard norm, they risk being bullied, discriminated, labelled s impaired and push to the edge of society becoming spectators behind a glass wall. It is a weakness that deprives us of contributions from unique minds that are vauable to us all because they are different, because they think out of the box
  3. (from 17:04 to 17:20). The quirkier kid from school, like me, has just as much to offer the world as anybody else. Every human being is a resource, and society has to broaden its framework to allow everyone a place in it.
  4. (from 17:27 to17:36 ) extraordinary things can and have been done by ordinary people no matter through which spectrum we perceive the world

My call to all of us, autistics, caregivers and professionals alike... redefine normal. challenge the current norms. Embrace us autistics because of our autism, not in spite of it.



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